Staying Connected: A Lesson for Leaders During COVID-19

Staying Connected


By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

Executives are dealing with a myriad of challenges during this pandemic. Mass layoffs have resulted in consumer spending grinding to a halt. Retailers are scrambling to adapt to the rapidly changing consumer habits. Many big box retailers are on the brink of collapse. What steps can be taken now to connect with the public when money simply isn’t flowing?
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Maintaining a culture of trust during a crisis

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By Martin Royal

As many organizations prepare to encourage their workforce to work remotely, the change of work environment has the potential to impact employee's perception of the organization, of the leaders and of each other. It can be tricky to maintain a level of communication and trust when new remote workers are finding themselves working with other remote colleagues in multiple locations and time zones. One factor that could determine how well your team will work remotely together is that of trust, or the lack of it.

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COVID-19 Pandemic Planning: 8 Considerations to put the Safety of Your Teams and Business First


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By Eric Michrowski

The COVID-19 Pandemic is rapidly becoming a topic of urgent executive dialogue in the US and Canada as the rate of infections is rapidly growing and spreading within the community. As the landscape is swiftly evolving, several large gatherings and sporting events have been cancelled and the markets have responded wildly. Many businesses have responded swiftly and proactively while others with global footprints had to immediately respond in January with the first signs of an outbreak in China. Others are working through their strategies at this moment. Read More...

Working from Home: Tips and Considerations

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By Josh Williams, Ph.D. & Julia Borges, M.A.

Amidst the global COVID-19 pandemic, more organizational leaders are making the challenging and responsible decision to shift everyday work to be done remotely by employees. While this can support the slow of this pandemic, this work style can present a host of organizational challenges, stressors, and increase levels of uncertainty. If organizations are going to shift to remote work, it is important that they gather and implement best practices to make this transition as seamless as possible: Read More...

Working from home? Here is your safety checklist:

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By Brie DeLisi

Whether you are a seasoned remote employee or new to working from home due to COVID-19, there are a number of considerations to take for working at home safely.


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Key Elements in Stakeholder Management

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By Eric Johnson

Stakeholder management is formally defined as the “the systematic identification, analysis, planning and implementation of actions designed to engage with stakeholders.” Thus a “stakeholder” is “[any] individual or group with an interest in the project, program, or portfolio because they are involved in the work or affected by the outcomes.”1
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5 Common Pitfalls of Incorporating Culture & Change Management—And How to Avoid Them

Change

By Stephanie Monge-Sherman

There’s pivotal interplay between company culture and the overall success of a company. From owners of small businesses to CEOs of large corporations, this fact is recognized, embraced and leveraged to strengthen a company’s infrastructure. In fact, many people consider company culture to be the factor that determines whether a company falters or thrives. But you don’t have to believe that company culture is solely critical to a company’s success to acknowledge that employee engagement, support, and happiness are incredibly important. Read More...

How to Get Your Team to Adopt Your Company Vision While Supporting Company Culture

Vision


By Stephanie Monge-Sherman

A company vision can be incredibly abstract and hard to put into perspective, but it’s also key for a company’s success. After all, if you don’t know where you want to go, it’s pretty tough to get there. Once you’ve accomplished the (not insignificant) task of setting out your company vision and identifying the steps to get there, it’s time to get your team onboard. Leadership alone can’t produce results; cohesive teamwork at all levels is absolutely necessary, no matter the objective or the size of the company. Read More...

Employee Loyalty: The Answer to Job-Hopping

Doors

By Stephanie Monge-Sherman

If you’re expecting to pick a new hire after 1-2 interviews and have them stay for the rest of their career, you’re likely in for a disappointment: the days of guaranteed long-term hiring are over.

Job hopping, or the act of moving between jobs every year or two, is on the rise as employees look for the right fit. Employers now have to not only attract talent, but also work to keep them if they want their business to grow and thrive. This makes earning employee loyalty crucial since it’s key to retaining talent.

Employee loyalty is built on a few important pillars: recognition, leadership, incentives, engagement, and culture. The transformational leadership model is the true answer to continual job-hopping: it involves a leadership style that encourages employees to innovate and craft change for the betterment of a company’s future.


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Is Competition Really Healthy in the Workplace?

Competition

By Stephanie Monge-Sherman

In more recent years, companies have been starting to realize just how important workplace culture is, and how fundamentally it is tied to the success of the business. Where companies were previously attracting top talent on salary and benefits alone, it now takes more than that and something exponentially harder to offer: potential employees want to know that they’ll be happy in the workplace and experience job satisfaction in their role—no easy feat. Read More...

Diversity is key to business success: Leaders need to make a bigger pledge to drive impact

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From Eric Michrowski

The research is very clear on the value of diversity in the workplace. And when leaders think of diversity, it shouldn’t be limited to only 1 or 2 dimensions. The goal should be to bring as many perspectives and viewpoints to the table. In addition to being fair and a good corporate citizen, the purpose of diversity is to stimulate better debate when decisions are being made. When the right culture is in place, this helps improve the quality of solutions. In turn, this drives improved business performance. Read More...

Building a Culture in Small to Midsize Businesses (SMBs)


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By Julia Borges & Kelly Cave

What is organizational culture?

Many may know the term ‘culture’ as a word that describes the behavior, thoughts, feelings, and traditions of a group of a group of people or society (1). However, in organizational change and development, its definition means something slightly different. Culture, in the context of organizations, refers to the shared norms, beliefs, and attitudes that exist among the employees of the organization (2). For example, Southwest Airlines is famous for their friendly and helpful customer-oriented culture. At Southwest, employees are empowered to go the extra mile to make customers happy, which in turn leads to more employee buy-in of the common goal centered around excellence in customer-service. Organizational culture can manifest in various ways that either accelerate or decelerate organizational performance (3). The topic of organizational culture has become an increasingly popular area of focus, both in the management consulting industry and academia. This increasing popularity has resulted in the creation of management consulting firms who specialize solely in the transformation of organizational culture. Additionally, there are certifications, academic courses, and specializations dedicated to learning about organizational culture.
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Tapping the Startup Roots of Your Big Organization

Trees with sunshine through in the fall

By Eric Johnson

Many organizations become saddled with bureaucracy over time, which is a natural evolution of complexity and the incorporation of controls to manage risks within the business. However, many businesses started from much smaller entities, where communication was easier and productivity achieved with far fewer people and assets. Often, it is heard that large businesses want to “tap into their startup roots” which is often code for fast execution, swift decision-making, and quick recovery from errors or issues. While it is absolutely possible to re-introduce the “start-up” culture into your business, it involves a mindset shift from one of top-down regulation to one that empowers employees to make decisions and execute on behalf of the customer.

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The Benefits of Self-directed Learning



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By Kelly Cave & Julia Borges

Organizations face various challenges in today’s dynamic and complex world. With constantly changing technology, markets, and social trends, organizations must quickly learn and adapt in order to remain competitive within their markets. This increase in the importance of continuous learning has encouraged many organizations to transform themselves into learning organizations. A learning organization is an organization that places a high importance on learning and continuous improvement within their culture. This can be done by creating a supportive environment, implementing concrete learning processes, and encouraging leadership that reinforces learning (Garvin, Edmondson, & Gino, 2008). Whichever processes, methods, or practices leaders use to foster this type of culture, they all have a common goal: they want their team members to embrace continuous learning as a career-long process (Ellinger, 2004). As organizations work to become learning organizations, the more learning capability at the individual level becomes critical for success (Ellinger, 2004). Read More...

Generational Differences at Work: More Conflict Than Clarity?

team hands all in

By Madison Hanscom

Generational Differences at Work: More Conflict Than Clarity?
Most of us are familiar with generational stereotypes. Millennials are narcissistic, Gen Xers are cynical, and Baby Boomers are judgmental. When scanning the workplace, it might seem easy to find patterns of behavior that correspond with these generational cohort characteristics, but are these patterns actually there? And for any differences that do emerge, are these actually due to generational cohort membership? Read More...