Leadership

E-Commerce is going to surge this holiday season. Are you thinking about the workers?

E-Commerce is going to surge this holiday season


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Online shopping has become a regular part of the holiday season. It is more convenient than ever to send gifts across the globe from retailers we trust. Recently we have experienced an added benefit to online shopping — social distancing. Now we can rely on home delivery to avoid contact with crowds of people on Black Friday, Super Saturday, Boxing Day, and after Christmas sales. Although this certainly brings a lot of positives, there are important considerations when it comes to occupational safety.

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Transformational Leadership: How it Matters for Organizational Change

Transformational Leadership


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Organizations must continually change and adapt in order to sustain improvement in this dynamic world. Without change, companies risk falling behind and losing the competitive edge. Researchers are developing a picture of what leads to successful change and what factors contribute to failure, because unsuccessful change can be disruptive and expensive. For example, it is known that having a proper diagnosis before the change, forming a clear vision, mobilizing energy, removing barriers, developing knowledge and skills for the change, setting goals, and implementing feedback are all crucial components of successful transformation. Another critical component is supportive leadership.

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Ten Safety Leadership Skills for Success

Ten Safety Leadership Skills for Success

By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

There are
fundamental leadership skills leaders need to exhibit to demonstrate genuine “owning it” for safety. These safety leadership skills represent observable and measurable knowledge, skills, abilities and personal attributes that contribute to increased discretionary effort and improved organizational safety culture. Caring about safety is not enough. Good intentions are put into practice through behaviors and skills. The following ten skills and proficiencies reflect safety leadership best practices.
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How to promote employee engagement in a safety context

How to promote employee engagement in a safety context

By Madison Hanscom, PhD

An engaged workforce has strong, positive effects on safety. Engaged employees are more willing to go the extra mile and take pride in their work, so it should be a goal for leaders to create an environment for engagement in order to promote a safer workplace. Consider the following when developing your plan to promote employee engagement in a safety context:
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Soft Skills Training for Leaders: An Investment in Your Culture

Soft Skills Training for Leaders

By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

Soft skills training is needed at all leadership levels to improve communication, listening skills, and empathy. It also involves increasing the quality and quantity of safety recognition which is often found to be one of the lower scoring items on our safety culture survey. Increasing recognition improves safety culture and increases the probability of safe work practices in the future. This reduces the risk of serious injuries and fatalities (SIFs).

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Give them voice and listen: The power of pulse surveys

The power of pulse surveys

By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Employees want an active voice in your company, and leadership should be interested in what they have to say. The people are the culture, and it is in the best interest of leadership to know their perspective. Because it is often difficult to touch base with every employee, organizational surveys are a great way to listen more efficiently.

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Executives – Have you thought about your wellbeing lately?

Executives – Have you thought about your wellbeing lately


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

It is common to assume that executives, CEOs, and highly successful entrepreneurs just ‘have it all’, but many of these individuals are silently suffering. Executives can have a lot on their plate. They might feel responsible for the ups and downs of employees. They might work long hours and feel pressure to make the company more successful. They also can feel very isolated, like they can’t be vulnerable without looking weak.

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Get Employee Input… and Close the Loop

Get Employee Input and Close the Loop


By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

Leaders need to get more input from employees before making decisions that impact safety.
Better decisions are made when employee input is solicited. Participation rates are also higher. Years ago, we implemented a behavioral safety process in a manufacturing firm as part of a NIOSH grant. Half of the group designed their own card and rules for use (“participation group” ). The other half were given a card with instructions to follow (“compliance group” ). The participation group that designed their own process completed 7 times as many observations as the passive compliance group. In another organization, field employees were heavily consulted when revamping their pre-job brief meetings. During assessment activities, we were told that a) the process got much better, and b) people really appreciated leadership getting their input. This is good for safety and morale.

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3 Ways Leaders Can Grow their Brand and Shape Company Culture to Impact Business Outcomes

Culture change


By KyoungHee Choi

While culture is widely recognized as an important lever to grow brands, increase productivity, improve revenue while improving safety and customer experience outcomes, many organizations still find to drive an manage something that feels intangible. In challenging times, it may seem hard to invest time and resources into something that can’t easily be measured, like “company culture”. Especially when the very survival of your company itself is at stake. However, culture is far more than an abstraction. It is critical to bringing your values to life and to driving business success. In challenging times it’s even more important to invest in what makes you different in the marketplace.
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Encourage a growth mindset in your workplace

Encourage a growth mindset in your workplace


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Growth mindset is the notion that who we are as a person (e.g., our character, abilities, intelligence) is malleable and capable of being developed with effort. At the opposite end of the spectrum is a fixed mindset, which describes when an individual feels their talents and abilities are predetermined and not flexible. Those with a more fixed mindset might feel some people “have it” and others “don’t”. Research on this topic began in education, where it was observed that students with a growth mindset approached difficulty as a challenge, and they were more likely to persevere with success despite setbacks. Students with a growth mindset vs. a fixed mindset had higher motivation, effort, and school outcomes (like math grades) (1).
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How to develop a growth mindset

How to develop a growth mindset


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Changing how we think can have a profound impact on our life at home and work. Growth mindset is the notion that who we are as a person (e.g., our character, abilities, intelligence) is malleable and capable of being developed with effort. At the opposite end of the spectrum is a fixed mindset, which describes when an individual feels their talents and abilities are predetermined and not flexible. Those with a more fixed mindset might feel some people “have it” and others “don’t”. Research on this topic began in education, where it was observed that students with a growth mindset approached difficulty as a challenge, and they were more likely to persevere with success despite setbacks. Students with a growth mindset vs. a fixed mindset had higher motivation, effort, and school outcomes (like math grades) (1).
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Motivating remote workers

Motivating remote workers


By Madison Hanscom, Ph.D.

A team of researchers recruited 1135 participants to take place in a study that collected information on their work experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic over time. The data collection began in April of 2020 and will continue to run for 6 months. Initial findings were recently shared by the researchers (1). Among many results, the researchers uncovered that managers are feeling uncertain about employee motivation in a remote work setting — 41% of managers agreed with the statement “I am skeptical as to whether remote workers can stay motivated in the long term” and 17% were unsure.

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How to make your job more satisfying: Lessons from job crafting

Lessons from job crafting


Madison Hanscom, PhD

Sometimes work isn’t motivating. Many individuals feel dispassionate toward their job — finding it monotonous, boring, frustrating, or exhausting. Common suggestions for individuals who are unhappy with their job are to “find happiness outside of work” or “go get a new job” … but are these recommendations realistic? We spend a large portion of our lives working, so shouldn’t we at least enjoy it?
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Self-Motivation Styles of Effective Safety Leaders

Self Motivation Styles of Effective Safety Leaders

By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

Effective safety leaders have self-motivation styles which help them accomplish organizational goals. Four self-motivation styles (Steers & Porter, 1991) are relevant for understanding the self-motivation of safety leaders.
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Teach your people how to fish

jumpstory-download20200915-013729

By Madison Hanscom, PhD

What does the proverb “give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime” have to do with being a great leader? In short, it allows followers to be more self-reliant. As a result, employees will enjoy more autonomy in their job, potentially experience more meaning in their work, and it allows the leader to find better balance in their own time.

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Benefits to Limiting Social Media Use

Benefits to Limiting Social Media Use

By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Social media is everywhere. Good luck finding someone who doesn’t spend time on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, Snapchat, YouTube — you name it. But how does this impact our wellbeing? This is becoming a very important question. With more people social distancing and working remotely, many individuals are turning to social media for entertainment.

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Using the “High Six” to Improve Leadership Skills

Using the High Six to Improve Leadership Skills


Josh Williams, Ph.D.

Psychologists use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) to diagnosing mental and personality disorders. This classification and diagnostic tool identifies issues that disrupt people’s ability to maintain relationships, achieve goals, and experience fulfillment.
But what about a tool to diagnose and identify success and contentment?

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What goes around, comes back around? Virtual leadership and micromanaging

Virtual leadership and micromanaging


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

When it comes to leading a virtual or flex workforce, trust is everything. Managers are struggling with new ways of leading — including the delicate balance between giving enough direction without micromanaging. When leaders are accustomed to seeing employees in an office every day, it can be difficult adjusting to an arrangement that has less observational opportunities. In a flexible work model, it is not as easy to closely monitor due to physical proximity, but some leaders adjust well by embracing the opportunity to give people more autonomy. Other leaders do not adjust as well and try to closely monitor employees in ways that can quickly feel like an invasion of privacy (i.e., watching through webcams to ensure employees are working).

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Flex Work: The Need for a Long View in a Remote Workspace

The Need for a Long View for a Remote Workspace

By Dale Lawrence

While most leaders have adopted a plan of not bringing every employee back to the physical workplace, what is unclear is “how long?”, “how is this impacting my strategy?” and “what impact will this have on my business, partners and customers?”. Without a clear understanding of the long-term impacts of Coronavirus on society and specifically the economy, many leaders are unable to project far into the future business planning. Not only does this impact budgetary planning for capital and operating expenses, it changes how leaders look to growth, partnerships, supply chains, business improvements and customer experience initiatives.

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Managing a virtual workforce? Employees want to know your expectations

Managing a virtual workforce


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

When it comes to doing the job well, people need to know what is expected of them. Ambiguity can be a very stressful experience, and a great deal of individuals are in a working situation where they would like to know precisely what they should do to be considered a high performer. Unfortunately, for those working in remote positions, this is particularly difficult.
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Work from home experiences: Findings from a multinational survey

Work from home experiences



By Madison Hanscom, PhD


Covid-19 has contributed to a larger number of individuals working from home than ever before. Researchers at the Technical University of Denmark were interested in the experiences of individuals working from home across several European countries. They surveyed over 4,640 employees (mainly knowledge workers and managers) between March and May of 2020. The authors are still analyzing the large amounts of data that were collected, but initial findings were shared. Interesting results included:
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Do your employees have variety in their work tasks?

employees have variety in their work tasks

By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Let’s say you are about to start your workday. Imagine two scenarios:
• A day in which you will be doing the same task repeatedly for 8 hours
• A day in which you will rotate between a variety of tasks for 8 hours

Which would you prefer? Although it feels great to get really good at a particular task, over time this can take a toll on motivation. Research has shown that individuals with variety in their work tasks are more satisfied with their jobs (1). Repetitive tasks with little variation can also contribute to complacency and attentional issues, which can be detrimental to safety.
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What is associated with someone having greater resilience during the COVID-19 lockdown?

greater resilience

By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Researchers collected data from over a thousand adults in US to get a sense of what factors were associated with an individual having greater psychological resilience during the first few weeks of the COVID-19 lockdown (Kilgore, Taylor, Cloonan, & Dailey, 2020). They defined resilience as the ability to withstand setbacks, adapt positively, and bounce back from adversity. Although there are a great deal of factors related to resiliency (e.g., see our blog on
leadership and resiliency here), the researchers focused solely on factors related to sleep, emotional state, exercise, and daily activities.
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What do leaders have to do with employee resilience?

employee resilience


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

The extent to which individuals can “bounce back” to how things were pre-crisis describes their resiliency. It is beneficial to have a workforce of resilient employees who can recover quickly from difficult times. Not only is this better for the company (e.g., financially), it is better for the people (e.g., psychologically).
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What are the main causes of burnout?

What are the main causes of burnout


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Burnout is deep and pervasive. It is marked by emotional exhaustion, physical fatigue, cynicism towards others, and depleted mental resources (1).

The main causes: The five factors that were most strongly related to burnout (as indicated by a survey of nearly 7,500 full time employees) are unfair treatment at work, unmanageable workload, lack of role clarity, lack of communication and support from the management, and unreasonable time pressure (2). There is something these burnout correlates have in common — they are issues with the workplace, not the person. Although teaching employees strategies to deal with these burnout factors can be valuable (e.g., meditation, resilience), it is not addressing the root cause. It is up to management to fix the system and culture in order to make deep, meaningful change happen.
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Sheriff, Diplomat, Investigator: Which Style are You? (Trick Question)

Sheriff, Diplomat, Investigator


By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

Leaders with effective communication skills are better able to constructively express their vision, relate to employees, and achieve their own work goals compared to leaders with poor communication skills (Poertner & Miller, 1996). This directly impacts employees’ attitudes and behaviors for safety.

Unfortunately, communication with employees is sometimes strained, confrontational, or non-existent. Some interpersonal communication problems may be caused by incompatible communication styles between people. The following classification model may be useful (and fun) for understanding your communication style. This includes the sheriff, diplomat, and investigator (adapted from Poertner & Miller, 1996). A person’s communication style is a mix of all three components although one component (or two) is often most pronounced. Read More...

Does leadership training work? Findings from research.

Does leadership training work


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

There are a great deal of conflicting perspectives when it comes to leadership training. Many individuals do not think it is worth the time because they believe leaders are born and not made – that genetics and personality are more influential in determining a great leader than the knowledge, skills, and abilities someone can build and sharpen during training. Others think training is a valuable tool that leads to a better workforce. But what does the research say?
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Picture the O.C.E.A.N.: Learning from the Big 5 to Support Safety

Learning from the Big 5 to Support Safety



By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

Want to be a better safety leader? Picture the ocean. Not the Atlantic or Pacific but the acronym O.C.E.A.N. This stands for the Big 5 personality traits of Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism. Before addressing each trait in the Big 5, here’s a bit of history into its development.
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Increasing Employee Safety Commitment: Considerations for Leaders

Increasing Employee Safety Commitment


By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

Effective leaders continuously look for ways to increase employee safety commitment. Employees who feel committed to the organization are more likely to work safely, caution others for safety, and get actively involved in safety efforts. Those who aren’t committed rarely go beyond the call of duty for safety or anything else. In fact, they may have more serious issues such as non-compliance, absenteeism/tardiness, and confrontations with others. Organizational commitment consists of (Saal & Knight,1995):
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What can leaders do to create a less stressful workplace? [Part 3]

What can leaders do to create a less stressful workplace 3

By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Take care of your own stress and work with employees to build a “stress management toolbox”. As I mentioned in Part 1 of this blog series, the right solutions are going to depend on the source of stress, and the best solutions are primary solutions that address the root of the problem. As a leader, you often have more power than employees to make changes that reduce stressors, so consider what you can do first to create a healthier work environment (see the second blog in this series).
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What can leaders do to create a less stressful workplace? [Part 2]

What can leaders do to create a less stressful workplace 2


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Leaders are in a unique position where they can make positive changes that influence the lives of their employees. Consider the following strategies:
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What can leaders do to create a less stressful workplace? [Part 1]

What can leaders do to create a less stressful workplace 1


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Remember that not all stressors have the same impact, and not all stress interventions work similarly.

There are different types of stressors. Some stress can actually be a great thing. It can be energizing, create engagement, or promote personal growth. A job without stress of any kind would be boring, and we certainly would not grow professionally! If you think back to some of your greatest achievements, there were likely stressful moments along the way. This is normal and healthy.
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Beware the Lost Customer

Beware the Lost Customer



By Dale Lawrence

Operational leaders, over the past five months of COVID-19, have mostly focused on managing costs, making decisions on difficult layoffs and furloughs while trying to convince their customers to purchase goods and services. This has been a balancing act, but the customer likely has taken a back seat to the other operational needs. In a number of areas, the customer’s experience has been forgotten.
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What does being civil have to do with being safe?

What does being civil have to do with being safe


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

It is not a secret… when the workforce perceives that management considers safety to be as important as production, this is associated with great outcomes.
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Kindness is key: The power of respectful relationships at work

power of respectful relationships at work


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Respectful treatment is not always the norm in every work group. There are countless individuals who are required to interact with other workers and leaders who are rude, sarcastic, judgmental, and disrespectful. Incivility can be as subtle was a snarky remark, or as obvious as aggression.
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Can your leader at work influence life at home?

influence life at home



By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Whether it is wrapping up a deliverable, venting about a hard day, or preparing for the next day ahead, many of us bring work home. But has research been conducted to examine the effects of leadership characteristics spilling over into the home domain of their followers? A recent study was conducted to examine the impact that empowering leaders have on their employees’ home lives.
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Four Communication Styles for Safety: Which One Are You?

Four Communication Styles for Safety


By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

There are many ways leaders “show up” for safety. Effective communication is near the top of the list. Leaders show they understand and care through thoughtful, interactive conversations with employees. This includes strong listening skills and authentic responses to issues that arise. This is the essence of empathic communication and is vastly different from these maladaptive patterns: dominant, passive, and passive aggressive (adapted from Brounstein, 2001). A brief review of each style is provided below. Which one best reflects how you lead and interact with your employees?
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Flex Work and Loneliness: What Can We Do?

Flex Work and Loneliness What Can We Do?


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Working from home can be a positive opportunity for many individuals. It might come with a shorter commute, less interruptions, more productive work time, and less stress. Despite the huge number of employees who are enjoying working from home, a dark side to flex work for some can be the aspect of loneliness.
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Safety Leadership and Sports Analogies

Safety Leadership and Sports Analogies


By Josh Williams, Ph. D.

Fellow sports fans are lamenting the lack of televised sports in the COVID era. In fact, some are suggesting the lack of sports are actually creating low levels of anxiety and depression in more passionate fans. “One of the first things to recognize is that, yes, sports is a form of entertainment. But it is also a source of social connectiveness with family, friends and with a team,” said Dr. Mark Terjesen, a professor of psychology at St. John’s. “For some, the absence of sports compared to everything else may seem frivolous. But, for the rest of us, it’s a way of life. Many fans have a deep, personal history with teams and with fellow fans." (Gross, 2020).

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Considerations for Leaders in Sustaining Organizational Learning within a Flex Work Model

Considerations for Leaders

By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Learning organizations are those that acquire information, share it, process it, and use it for continual improvement. All teams must develop mechanisms and buy-in for supporting this knowledge sharing cycle, though it is particularly important that companies utilizing a flex work model do this well in order to succeed. Without a strong collective knowledge bank, it is likely your company will spend a lot of time taking one step forward and two steps back.
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Setting the Right G.O.A.L.S. for Safety

Setting the Right GOALS for Safety


By Josh Williams, Ph. D.

Leaders need to make sure they set intelligence safety goals to improve performance and prevent SIFs. Proper goal setting helps field leaders and employees understand the value of a unified greater purpose. They also set objective, actionable behaviors which should be integrated into daily activities. Research demonstrates that there is a statistically significant reduction in injuries when leaders effectively articulate a compelling vision and inspire employees to work towards goals that meet that mission (Hoffmeister et al., 2014). Also, a 10% improvement in employee’s understanding of organizational values and goals results in a 12.7% reduction in safety incidents (Gallup, 2017). The G.O.A.L.S. acronym is a helpful heuristic to set smart safety goals for the organization. Safety goals should have these elements:
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Reducing Organizational Footprints

Reducing Organizational Footprints


By Eric Johnson

The tidal wave of working from home experiences may ultimately push many organizations to permanently establish work from home capabilities even after the Covid crisis has ended. Some organizations will push for a majority of their employees to stay home fully, while others may require in office work periodically for everyone, possibly on a weekly or staggering scale, e.g. alphabetically by day or by specific business unit based on strategic need. Considering the above, organizations have a tremendous opportunity to extract expenses and improve both the balance sheet and P&L through the strategic planning of facilities.
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Cost Analysis and the Organization

Cost Analysis and the Organization

By Eric Johnson

Every organization engages in constant analysis of the business and the reduction in costs is no exception. Obviously during the pandemic everyone is making sure to account to the last penny where they can save and pull costs out of the business. Even during good times, responsible stewards are always on the hunt to see where they can create efficiencies and do more with less.

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Ethics and Flex Work

Ethics and Flex Work

By Madison Hanscom PhD

As more individuals are working from home than ever, this raises interesting questions and important considerations regarding ethics. When working remotely, there are more circumstances in which employees and leaders alike operate under little surveillance. There are several ethical perspectives that should be considered in a flexible work environment. Two important ones are the ethics involved with employee work and the ethical situations leaders might encounter.

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Flex Work – 2022?

Flex Work – 2022



By Eric Johnson

Further into the future as the pandemic has waned for some time, idea of flex work as a normal aspect of business operations may become permanent as organizations grow accustomed to the cost savings and flexibility offered to workers. With several considerations, organizations can plan around the culture shift and assist employees by creating purposeful guidelines and norms for the future.

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Rethinking the Workspace

rethinking the workspace

By Dale Lawrence

As we slowly step out into the world, still mindful of Coronavirus, we need to consider that for the next 12-18 months (or much longer) our concept of daily commuting to an office, sitting at a desk, attending meetings in boardrooms and commuting back home has changed and may never return to how it was previously. While the natural reaction of most companies is to call their employees back to work, employers should be asking asking important questions: Why? Is it really safe? Are we bringing workers to the office because we want to see the employees together? Is it because we yearn for normal? Do we need to portray confidence? Or are we bringing them back because we have the physical space? None of these reasons would be wrong. It is critical to capture the business needs; however, self-reflection may open some new opportunities.
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How to reduce customer anxiety in car sales

contactless car sales

By Julia Borges

Purchasing a vehicle is always a big deal. From deciding between various vehicle options to filling out all necessary paperwork, it can certainly cause a fair amount of anxiety for customers. Financing or leasing a car has always been viewed as a long, tedious process with many steps that will most likely keep customers there for the majority of their day – and in some cases, can even take multiple days.

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Managing Justice Perceptions When Flex Work Causes Interpersonal Conflict

Managing Justice Perceptions When Flex Work


By Madison Hanscom, Ph.D.

Whether it is full time or part of the time, more people are working from home than ever. Although it is becoming clear that many individuals enjoy working virtually, tensions can build between different groups of employees who work onsite as residents, those who work flexibly between the office and home, and those who work entirely from home.
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Leadership Considerations for a Successful Flex Work Model

Leadership Considerations for a Successful Flex Work


By Madison Hanscom, Ph.D.

Researchers who study telework argue that successful virtual teams are determined more by successful or unsuccessful leadership rather than other factors such as technology (1). Poor leadership is poor leadership. If you take a substandard leader and move them into a flex work environment - they won’t do any better. There are foundational leadership competencies that help all teams succeed - whether the team is in an office or working remotely. These include leading with a big picture goal and supporting the company’s vision, building interpersonal connections and collaboration, walking the talk, demonstrating ethics and integrity, managing change, creating a safe space for people to speak up and innovate, and more.

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Will Flex Work Change My Culture?

Will Flex Work Change My Culture


By Madison Hanscom, Ph.D.

As many businesses are considering (or have already decided) moving some employees to a permanent telework model after the COVID-19 outbreak, the question comes up often —
What does this mean for the culture? A company’s culture is composed of the beliefs, assumptions, norms, and core values that the members hold (Schein, 1985). The people are your culture - so any major change in how people work within your company has the potential to change the culture - for better or for worse.

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Is My Culture Supportive of Flex Work?

Is My Culture Supportive of Flex Work

By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Introducing telework into a culture that does not support flexible work arrangements can set up a business for failure. It is important to deeply consider culture before, during, and after changes to the company that involve employees working from home. If the attitude is that telework is not going to succeed - it will not. A company’s culture is composed of the beliefs, assumptions, norms, and core values that the members hold (1). Norms and assumptions run deep, and they are all around (staying at your desk late to symbolize commitment to the boss, how long to take a coffee break, the clothes you wear to the office, how you talk to your team vs. your leader, what is frowned upon, and so on). Clearly these everyday practices and assumptions will be disturbed by integrating a major new component into work.

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Rethinking the Tight Grip: A Flex Work Tip for Leaders

flex work tip for leaders



By Madison Hanscom, PhD

If you are accustomed to a leadership style that involves close monitoring to feel in control of what employees are doing daily, this will be a point of consideration when employees transitioning to more flexible telecommuting model. Previously, you might have conducted “walk-arounds” to observe work onsite. With a flexible work environment, this will not be as possible.
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What’s in it for the workers? Benefits of Flex Work

flex work and what is in it for workers



By Madison Hanscom, PhD


In previous blogs we have discussed the benefits companies can experience from Flex Work arrangements (1). Because flexible work requires less commuting and office space, this also has positive implications for the environment. This is because there is an associated reduction in greenhouse gas emissions (2). There are clear benefits to businesses and the environment, but how about individuals? Although some individuals experience negative components of remote work, such as loneliness (see our blog post on common challenges associated with Flex Work, 3), there are many positive outcomes employees can enjoy from Flex Work.
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Flex Work from a Process Perspective

Flex work from process perspective


By Eric Johnson

In a related post we discussed the implications of remote work activities from an accounting and finance perspective. But what about the actual work that needs to get done? How does an organization transition an office setup complete with all the needs for performing job duties, into a decentralized network of home or remote-based employees? What are the modifications in terms of job activities and work processes that necessitate a change from the current state?
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Flex Work from an Accounting and Finance Perspective

Flex work financial benefits


By Eric Johnson

As the pandemic further pushes the work environment into remote and off-site arrangements, we are beginning to see conversations regarding the future of work, and what remote working would encompass over the course of a longer period of time. Many organizations already have telecommuting options to reduce employees’ exposure to long commute times, approaching this type of arrangement as a perk of employment.
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Returning to a Safe and Healthy Office Work Environment Blog Series: Office Environment Setup

Office Environment Setup

By Brie DeLisi

Many of us are in the process of shifting back into office environments or considering the appropriate next steps for a safe return to the office. Fortunately, there are a number of steps that can be taken for the physical work environment to ensure employees are kept as safe and healthy as possible. The purpose of these physical work environment adjustments is to ensure employees can be properly distanced to avoid COVID exposures the air and that shared resources limit surface exposures. Considerations should include employee distancing, space resourcefulness, adding structures, air ventilation, shared resources and sanitation.
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Returning to a Safe and Healthy Office Work Environment Blog Series: The New Normal

Ferris wheel


By Brie DeLisi

Have the last few months felt like a rollercoaster? It is time for us to embrace the new normal, in which nothing is ‘normal’ anymore. This blog series will explore options for returning to the office (or not), what the new workplace might look like, and how to best prepare for what might be a long period of uncertainty.




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Concerned About Flex Work?

Concerned About Flex Work

By Madison Hanscom, Ph.D.


There is evidence to suggest that Flex Work can be a very successful model. Whether working entirely remote from home or in a flex arrangement between the office and home, this can have positive implications for the bottom line (see:
The Financial Benefits of Having a Flex Work Environment) and for the individual.
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Strategies for Workers, From Workers: Creating a Successful Flex Work Experience

Strategies for Workers

By Madison Hanscom, Ph.D.

The nature of work is changing to be more flexible, and it is becoming more essential to understand the best ways to work remotely. In a research study examining practices utilized by high performing teleworkers (1), strategies were identified that help workers overcome common barriers associated with remote work. These include:
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Leadership Competencies and COVID Re-Entry

leadership-competencies


Drs. Josh Williams and Madison Hanscom

Leaders are looking for direction to manage employees during COVID re-entry. Leaders need to juggle business realities, employees’ physical safety, and emerging mental health struggles that people are facing. Our leadership competency model is a useful framework to guide leadership behaviors as we begin getting back to work.

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The Financial Benefits of Having a Flex Work Environment

Reduced office capacity


By Dale Lawrence

There is ample evidence that most organizations see productivity gains when their workers are able to work in a flexible environment, whether entirely based in their home-office or flex between the office and their home. This doesn’t mean everything is rosy and the recent and sudden movement home during the pandemic saw many workers having to share workspace with their families. This wasn’t ideal but necessary. However, now that most businesses are beginning their journey to work in the new normal, it is time to evaluate one aspect that can provide real savings for your business. Flex Work as a permanent work style. There is data to prove it.
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Walk the Talk During a Time of Crisis: An Application of Propulo’s Safe Production Leadership Model

leadership-competencies

By Madison Hanscom

It is the responsibility of leaders to demonstrate how to act during times of uncertainty. At its core, walking the talk involves leaders acting in ways that align with their stated values and the stated values of the company. When a leader practices what they preach, this builds trust among followers, which is the belief that leaders will act in their best interest. This in turn helps create improved safety culture, morale, and safety outcomes. Although employees always look to leaders as role models, this is particularly important during times of crisis. During difficult moments like the one we are currently in with the COVID-19 pandemic, there are several things you can do to “walk the talk”:
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Drive Thinking & Speaking During a Time of Crisis: An Application of Propulo’s Safe Production Leadership Model

leadership-competencies

By Madison Hanscom

Great leaders do not act like they are the smartest person in the room. They know the value of a team effort, and they value insight from everyone. Regardless of where employees fall in the hierarchy, it is important to get everyone thinking and speaking. This is particularly important during a time of uncertainty or crisis, when workplaces are constantly adapting to the changing environment. People will remember how leaders respond during a time of turbulence, and this includes whether employees feel safe to speak up without negative consequences. This is required if the goal is to have a safe and resilient workplace. There are several things you can do to drive thinking and speaking…
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Brand Empathy - Why it’s Important for a Positive Customer Experience

lost-key-in-maze-shows-customer-solution


By Leah Ladipoh

Brands need to constantly adapt to ever changing demands of customers as information and goods move at an increasingly rapid rate. The customer experience strategy is critical for all modern brands and businesses as the global digital revolution continues. Brands of all sizes need to review this strategy obsessively to ensure that brand messaging, customer service skills and communication strategy are aligned throughout all levels of the organization.
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RIP Paul O’Neill: Safety Champion

Paul O’Neill

By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

The world lost a great safety champion last week in former Treasury Secretary and Alcoa Chairman and CEO Paul O’Neill. O’Neill was a fierce advocate of employee safety and took big risks (and won!) going “all in” on injury prevention. He took the bold step of saying there were no budget constraints for safety at Alcoa, even if that meant lost revenue and an unhappy Board of Directors.
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Building Supply Chain Resilience Helps to Mitigate Global Impacts from Pandemics

Trade-Impact-from-Coronavirus

By Dale Lawrence

Every company is impacted in some way by Coronavirus and in many organizations, their supply chain experienced great challenges. After decades of supply chain integration, the wave of countries going into quarantine illustrated how interconnected we all have become. In only a few weeks, organizations around the world quickly felt the impacts from shortages of spare parts, natural resource shipments, disrupted human capital, shifting human behavior and buying patterns, gaps in information and technology, customer orders in progress and outstanding payments.
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Preparing Your Business for Another Business Interruption

business-strategy


By Dale Lawrence

While not all businesses have emerged from the current fire-fighting mode after the first shock of the Black Swan pandemic, many companies are assessing the impacts to their business and clients. While there are also some recent signs some organizations are preparing for some sort of normal, it is really the time to prepare for another disruption. As a leader, it is more important than ever to conduct Business Recovery Planning sessions, review your strategy, make adjustments and prepare for another business interruption. Coronavirus will likely hit us again and the effort to prepare is needed.
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Gearing Up for the New Normal: Leadership Preparation Post COVID-19

crisis-management

By Dr. Josh Williams

Leaders are desperately working to address financial, health, and remote working challenges associated with COVID-19. Managing the immediate crisis is imperative to keep operations running. However, leaders also need to start thinking about next steps when social distancing restrictions ease. Until a vaccine is developed, getting back to “normal” will be a gradual, staged process unlike turning on a light switch. Leaders need to hit the ground running with new plans and protocols to manage various waves of returning to normalcy. This includes safely managing employees and working with clients.
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How a Strong Safety Climate Makes a Difference During a Pandemic

crisis_management


By Madison Hanscom

Safety climate is a shared perception that employees have regarding the relative importance of safe conduct in their workplace. This includes the procedures, policies, routines, and behaviors that get rewarded or the behaviors that are expected (1). It is widely understood there are a great deal of benefits associated with having a strong safety climate. A strong safety climate is associated with higher morale, less accidents, stronger safety motivation, more safety behaviors from employees, and so on (2,3). A less visible (yet still important) benefit of having a strong safety climate is the potential to protect workers and the general public from a viral outbreak. Read More...

Making difficult decisions about safety during COVID-19

worker-in-production-facility


By Brie DeLisi

Many companies are finding themselves making unexpected difficult decisions around their state of business and employee safety. Do I continue operations and potentially expose my employees to COVID-19? Do I shut down operations and risk going out of business? What other options do I have?

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Design Thinking with a Remote Workforce: How to Drive Process and Customer Experience Improvements During Coronavirus

tablet-of-online-workshop


By Dale Lawrence

Even during massive business disruptions, job losses and a shift in your customer’s attention, your business is still moving forward. This is not the time to stop innovating. This is not the time to give up on your customers. Many of your workers are feeling isolated and struggling to be productive and likely have far more discretionary time than ever before. It was been shown that a remote workforce starts their day earlier, can have less distractions during the workday and tends to work later than the traditional office worker.
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COVID-19 in the Construction Industry – Managing Distancing from a Work Perspective

large-construction-site-cranes-and-scaffolding


By Eric Johnson

As calls for distancing continue to increase in both social environments and working environments, social behaviors can adapt relatively quickly to increasing distance, but work environments can pose challenges. The cases of the latter can involve situations that require the presence of employees in a mandatory way and/or in a teamwork environment. In the case of construction, we look at several types of organizations in the construction industry and how the COVID-19 recommended social distancing will affect both the organization and the business.
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Staying Connected: A Lesson for Leaders During COVID-19

Staying Connected


By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

Executives are dealing with a myriad of challenges during this pandemic. Mass layoffs have resulted in consumer spending grinding to a halt. Retailers are scrambling to adapt to the rapidly changing consumer habits. Many big box retailers are on the brink of collapse. What steps can be taken now to connect with the public when money simply isn’t flowing?
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COVID-19 – An opportunity to live your values in the eyes of your Customer

An-opportunity-to-live-your-values-eyes-of your-Customer


By Eric Michrowski

The COVID-19 Black Swan event has provided a unique opportunity for brands to demonstrate how they live their values, particularly as it relates to Customers. Some brands have stepped up and demonstrated their customer-centricity in challenging times. Others have tried to pursue profit over Customer loyalty.
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Adjusting Your Company to Adapt to the Post-Coronavirus Business Environment (The New Normal)

four-business-people-in-boardroom-applauding-for-success


By Dale Lawrence

Obviously, many businesses are not doing well in this major crisis. Hourly news stories of massive lay-offs, enormous supply chain disruptions, poor customer confidence and hit-and-miss political leadership adds to the human health tragedy. It is easy right now to get pulled into the mud. While many of the issues are out of our hands, there is a lot we can do. Starting with your organization. Read More...

Turning Crisis into Opportunity: A guide for Small & Medium Business Leaders

small-business-woman-at-work-as-fashion-designer


By Vicki Scott

While this can be incredibly trying time for Small & Medium business leaders, or those in specialty business categories, there will be survivors! The road ahead will require massive action, determination and work. Canadian small businesses make up 41.7% of our GDP. Between 2013 and 2018, 56.8% of all new jobs were created by small businesses. Read More...

Three powerful leadership principles to guide you through the COVID-19 Black Swan

lighthouse-during-tough-business-times


By Kyounghee Choi

Here are three powerful principles to help guide your decision-making across both your business and personal life as you navigate through this black swan crisis. There is no perfect formula, case study, analysis or best practice that can be relied upon as this crisis is so unique by its very nature. However, the role of the leader is so critical to ensure long term success. Decisions being made today will help guide whether you survive, thrive or fail when calm waters arrive. Leaders need to have a deeper understanding of what is happening and secure the support of the broader team, quickly. Just as one would sail through an intense storm, leaders cannot control the wind, but leaders can control the course and direction of the ship. This is the time for leaders to take firm control of the direction, seek a path with less turbulence and guide the ship across. Read More...

Is your remote workforce prepared for COVID-19 cybersecurity threats?

technology safety

By Martin Royal

While taking care of our health and safety during the COVID-19 crisis is the priority, many will find themselves working remotely for the first time and might face other potential threats: cybersecurity threats.
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Maintaining a culture of trust during a crisis

maintaining_trust


By Martin Royal

As many organizations prepare to encourage their workforce to work remotely, the change of work environment has the potential to impact employee's perception of the organization, of the leaders and of each other. It can be tricky to maintain a level of communication and trust when new remote workers are finding themselves working with other remote colleagues in multiple locations and time zones. One factor that could determine how well your team will work remotely together is that of trust, or the lack of it.

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8 Tips for Managing Distractions While Working Remotely

Please do not disturb



By Stephanie Monge-Sherman

Are you working remotely and finding it hard to focus on work tasks? While frustrating, this lack of focus is completely normal. The reason for your wandering attention is because our brains have a limited conscious capacity. Translation: we can only focus on a small number of things at once.
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12 Tips for Coaching a Remote Workforce During This Black Swan Event: PART TWO

woman working from home



By Stephanie Monge-Sherman

While your leadership team may be in crisis mode and navigating the best decisions for your people and the business, management is pivoting their teams and adapting leadership styles to a remote workforce. As noted in Part One of this blog series, effective communication is crucial to coaching employees--but remote coaching strategies do not end there. A truly successful approach to remotely coaching a workforce also involves bolstering the mental vitality of your team for better productivity and overall happiness. Read More...

12 Tips for Coaching a Remote Workforce During This Black Swan Event: PART ONE

Video call


By Stephanie Monge-Sherman

Coaching as a management skill has been a hot topic for years with thousands of blogs, books, and courses offered on the topic. To add to this complexity is the equally challenging task of managing a remote workforce, which by necessity or choice, more and more companies are deciding to do. It’s understandable that many leaders who are new to this likewise relatively novel practice may need some clear and concise suggestions to help them navigate their way through coaching a remote workforce. Read More...

Leading a safe and productive workforce during times of uncertainty

culture_of-team


By Brie DeLisi

The world has been incredibly impacted over the course of the last month with COVID-19 and impacts on our economy. Leaders are being confronted with challenges that they have never had to address before, and it can be overwhelming. Leadership skills during this time are more important than they have ever been, to continue to promote a culture of safety and productivity.

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Executive Messaging During COVID-19

leadership_communication


By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

The true test of leadership is how well you function in a crisis.” – Brian Tracy

The Importance of Large-Scale Communication
Executive leadership skills are tested in crisis. Senior leaders are facing challenges now that not only threaten the survival of their companies but the lives of their employees and those they serve. As you may have noticed, leaders are now sending mass emails out to the public addressing their response to COVID-19. These email blasts represent a great opportunity for leaders to connect directly with the public to share their vision and values during this crisis. Unfortunately, many of these messages feel canned and generic and simply miss the mark.

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Four Ways to Stay Connected in a Virtual World

business man on phone at computer


By Julia Borges

Virtual Work and COVID-19

If our world wasn’t already virtual, it sure is now. Amidst the Novel COVID-19 pandemic that has completely changed the way the world works, businesses are faced with the challenge of staying connected in a virtual world. Many businesses may already be comfortable with working virtually as this is has become increasingly popular over the years, but for some businesses, this way of working is uncharted territory. Read More...

Leading Your Business Through COVID-19: Shifted Your Teams to Remote Work, But Now What?

working-from-home-on-computer-writing-notes


By Dale Lawrence

While we all are experiencing a number of fast-moving business problems, most companies have shifted work to remote locations with little preparation. Like running out of the office at the sign of a fire, many employees didn’t take more than the basics. Hopefully the basics included a laptop and mobile device, but this may not be the case everywhere. If your company hasn’t fully assessed the business requirements for transitioning every role to remote work, you likely have gaps. Some gaps are likely hidden and serious.

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COVID-19 Impacts to the Construction Industry

Change leaders, please stand up!

Leader-with-team


By Martin Royal

I wrote about what sets apart effective change leaders in a previous blog post, namely their ability to frame the change effort and building the capacity of the team to implement and sustain the change. For the most part, this assumes that leaders are engaged in a planned, thoughtful and deliberate change effort. Sometimes, the change effort is not so deliberate and comes knocking at our door unexpectedly.
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Leading During COVID-19: A Time for Compassion


business-leader-speaking-to-team

By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

Leaders face a new world of challenges influencing employees during COVID-19. Everyone is under tremendous pressure with the uncertainty of tomorrow. Many people have loved ones they may not be able to see or speak with directly because of social distancing. Others know friends and family that have lost jobs as the economy reels. 401K’s are tanking. Critical home supplies are increasingly scarce.
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What happens if I discover someone has COVID-19 at my workplace?


leadership-during-COVID-19

By Madison Hanscom

In order to keep yourself, your employees, and others around you free from illness, it is important to backtrack and reflect where you have been in the past two weeks to assess exposure. This includes the work environment. What if one of your employees has been in close proximity to an individual in the workplace who now has been diagnosed with COVID-19 or someone who is displaying symptoms?
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Dealing with COVID-19: Alleviating Stress & Anxiety via Communication

business-people-with-stress-due-to-CoronaVirus


By Maggie Carey

As we face these trying times it is easy to get swept into the hysteria that surrounds COVID-19. Coronavirus is real, and try as we might, we do not have control over it. However, we do have control over how we respond to it. So, how can we change the way we communicate to manage our current stress and anxiety?

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COVID-19 Pandemic Planning: 8 Considerations to put the Safety of Your Teams and Business First


doctors-in-hallway


By Eric Michrowski

The COVID-19 Pandemic is rapidly becoming a topic of urgent executive dialogue in the US and Canada as the rate of infections is rapidly growing and spreading within the community. As the landscape is swiftly evolving, several large gatherings and sporting events have been cancelled and the markets have responded wildly. Many businesses have responded swiftly and proactively while others with global footprints had to immediately respond in January with the first signs of an outbreak in China. Others are working through their strategies at this moment. Read More...

When Good Processes Go Bad

good_and_bad_processes


By Eric Johnson

We always talk about processes as going from bad to great, based on deliberate projects and other interventions that recognize issues as they arrive; and when identified, how management reacts to the discovery and its attempts to resolve the problems. Read More...

Safe Production Leadership Competency Series: Drive Thinking and Speaking

Leadership competencies


By Kelly Hamilton, Madison Hanscom, & Josh Williams

A key responsibility of leaders is creating an environment where people can do their best work. To do this well, leaders must be able to drive thinking and speaking—in other words, to foster a climate in which people feel they can speak up without fear of negative consequences, known as psychological safety. Leaders drive thinking and speaking by creating an environment of psychological safety, getting employee input for safety solutions, encouraging system thinking, and reinforcing teamwork and collaboration. Leaders who effectively create this environment increase employee engagement and decrease the likelihood of serious injuries and fatalities.
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Safe Production Leadership Competency Series: Recognize and Foster Growth

Leadership competencies


By Kelly Hamilton, Madison Hanscom, & Josh Williams

A critical skill all leaders must develop is the ability to provide high-quality feedback to their team members so they can perform their jobs well and grow and advance in their careers. When leaders do this well, it can fuel employee motivation and commitment, as well as positive safety outcomes. Read More...

Safe Production Leadership Competency Series: Build and Live the Vision

Leadership competencies


By Kelly Hamilton, Madison Hanscom, & Josh Williams

One of the most important jobs of any leader is to build and live the vision for employees. Building and living the vision means painting a picture for employees of desired performance and living and managing organizational values in everyday interactions. Providing employees with a sense of the organization’s vision and mission should inspire them to align their goals with those of the organization. Research indicates that when leaders encourage employees to strive for something beyond their individual goals, this has a positive impact on safety climate, safety compliance, and safety participation. Read More...

Safe Production Leadership Competency Series: Walk the Talk

Leadership competencies


By Kelly Hamilton, Madison Hanscom, & Josh Williams

It is not uncommon for leaders – who are pulled in many directions at once – to take shortcuts when it comes to safety. This can be detrimental, however, to safety culture and employees’ safety behaviors. In fact, research has shown that when employees perceive their leaders are not acting in ways that align with the company’s stated safety values, it leads to a decrease in safety compliance, a decrease in prioritization of avoiding accidents, and an increase in injuries.

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Safe Production Leadership Competency Series: Active Caring Promotes Positive Safety Culture

Leadership competencies



By Kelly Hamilton, Madison Hanscom, & Josh Williams

A common complaint of employees is that leadership doesn’t dedicate enough time to listen to and respond to their needs. Over time, this can lead workers to believe their leaders don’t care about them or their concerns, which can erode safety culture. Active Caring is a core leadership competency because it demonstrates organizational support and fosters a sense of support and trust among employees, leading to positive outcomes for employees, the team, and the entire organization.

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Blog Series: Five Core Safe Production Leadership Competencies that Drive Safe Production Culture

Leadership competencies

By Kelly Hamilton, Madison Hanscom, & Josh Williams

In today’s increasingly complex workplace, organizational leaders must be equipped to effectively deal with the relentless demands of daily decisions, challenges, and opportunities that impact all aspects of business, including safety. It is increasingly important to make intelligent decisions for safety in order to advance safety culture and prevent serious injuries and fatalities at work. Read More...

The “Shocking” Power of Leadership

electricity



By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

In of the most famous psychological experiments in history, Stanley Milgram set up a situation in which participants believed they were providing electric shock to a perfect stranger (who was actually a paid actor) as part of a study on memory and learning. Participants were told to shock the person, who was in another room, when he or she gave incorrect answers to various word pair questions. In some cases, the actor made a point to say he had a heart condition. Read More...

The Front-line connection – leveraging the front-line in execution excellence

search-for-service


By Eric Johnson

The front-line of many organizations is often the first segment of interaction of the company to its customers. In a past post, we have discussed the importance of customer care. In this post, we discuss empowering employees to make the decisions that align with the organization while increasing their own satisfaction with their roles and ability to achieve their career objectives. Read More...

The Value of Mentoring in Safety

safety mentorship



By Eric Johnson

When our organization engages clients, one of the first steps we perform in our assessments centers around establishing a baseline regarding the safety culture climate within the organization at all levels. These questions center around elements such as “What is the overall view of safety within the organization?”; “How do employees react to injuries – both to themselves and to others?”; “How does safety messaging impact employees”. The answers to these questions often depend on both the current safety climate but also historical data. Within the conversational aspect of our assessments, we often come across a common theme that can enhance and support a growing safety culture – the component of mentoring within safety. Read More...

Stay energized through self-reflection!

self reflection leadership

By Martin Royal

For many leaders, the responsibilities associated with their roles take a significant toll on their energy levels. Leaders make many decisions, participate in diverse daily tasks, attend many meetings, and monitor progress on organizational goals. There is evidence that these responsibilities slowly take away the leader's energy and ability to remain engaged at work. When this energy depletion occurs, leader performance may suffer and they may be prone to violate work norms and expectations, and this may also further impact their teams and direct reports. In more extreme cases, this can lead to the leader's burnout. Read More...

Promoting a Learning Culture with After Action Reviews (AAR)

After Action Review


By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

The manner in which incident analyses are handled in organizations has a significant impact on organizational culture. Empirical research demonstrates effective information sharing and incident analysis practices are significantly related to fewer incidents and injuries (Wachter & Yorio, 2014). In healthy organizations, AARs are viewed within the context of a learning environment to prevent similar incidents in the future. This includes looking at all system factors contributing to incidents. In less healthy cultures, AARs neglect to fully address these factors and may be perceived as blame oriented by employees. Read More...

The ‘Lumberjack’

Lumberjack

By Eric Michrowski

We’ve all seen it or heard the stories. Someone claims to have been injured and seeks benefits. Or someone that is always off with “injuries”. I’ve heard all of them over the years including a worker that was injured over 35 times in a 20-year career! Injury-prone or are these signs of something more? Read More...

Leadership Visibility: The importance of leaving the desk and getting out into the field

safe workers

By Julia Borges and Madison Hanscom

As we move into a world where the use of technology is rapidly increasing to make our work lives more seamless, it can be easy to forget about the importance of human interaction. While artificial intelligence has become a vital part of organizational performance, human interaction is still at the core of organizational health, culture, and safety. In today’s complex, technology-driven world of work, leaders are as busy as they ever have been, making it difficult for them to get away from their desk and out into the field with their teams. While leaders have a commitment to their tasks, duties, and team members, balancing these critical components can pose quite a challenge for leaders across various types of organizations. Read More...

Lessons Learned from Mining, Refining and the Cleveland Browns

workers at plant_Fotor (2)


By Josh Williams

With apologies to our friends in Ohio, the Cleveland Browns professional football team has been historically bad for decades. Their record over the last 10 years is 48-122 (31st out of 32 teams in winning percentage). It was recently announced they will be looking for a new head coach to change their culture and start winning more games. Surely change is needed to reverse their losing ways, right? Read More...

Leadership 101: How to be a Great Leader and Drive Employee Commitment

Leadership 101

By Steph Andel

To be a great leader, you have to first understand what a leader is. So, what is a leader? When we say leadership, what do we mean? Although these seem like simple questions, there are actually “as many definitions of leadership as there are persons who have attempted to define the concepts” according to renowned psychologist Ralph M. Stogdill. While narrowing down leadership to just one definition is difficult, we believe leadership can be broadly defined through its distinction from basic management. Specifically, true leaders obtain commitment from employees, whereas basic managers merely obtain compliance. The heart of this difference lies in the particular behaviors demonstrated by leaders. Read More...

In Praise of Tactical Patience

Tactical Patience Blog Post



There’s an old aphorism that is apocryphally attributed to Abraham Lincoln, which deals with the subject of cutting down a tree. ‘Give me six hours to chop down a tree,’ the saying goes, ‘and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.’ Various other versions of the saying exist, changing the times involved, but all with the same central thesis: use the majority of the time allotted to prepare for the task. Read More...

Lola Travel: The technology is good. The empathy is great

business-travel

By Sarah Moore & Eric Michrowski


Some of America’s oldest chapters in history were written on the banks of Boston’s Charles River, but today it hosts a different kind of revolution.

Paul English, co-founder and former Chief Technology Officer of Kayak (the website and app that helps you plan your next trip by searching hundreds of travel sites for the best deal) is once again revolutionizing the world of travel. Read More...

Transforming, Innovating, Growing: The case for leaders with diversified careers

transforming

By Eric Michrowski


HBR recently published a study on Transformational Leaders . One of the conclusions that caught my eye was that most of the leaders that had successfully transformed an industry or business had very diverse backgrounds (think Amazon's Bezos who came from a Finance background). They mention the importance of leaders that come with outside experience and that are brought into a business to drive change. Read More...

The first step Tim Sloan could take to clean up Wells Fargo’s culture

Wells Fargo


By Sarah Moore

Business leaders are scratching their heads wondering, 'how do we avoid the type of hot water Wells Fargo is currently dealing with?' We recommend starting here…
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