Performance

Get Employee Input… and Close the Loop

Get Employee Input and Close the Loop


By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

Leaders need to get more input from employees before making decisions that impact safety.
Better decisions are made when employee input is solicited. Participation rates are also higher. Years ago, we implemented a behavioral safety process in a manufacturing firm as part of a NIOSH grant. Half of the group designed their own card and rules for use (“participation group” ). The other half were given a card with instructions to follow (“compliance group” ). The participation group that designed their own process completed 7 times as many observations as the passive compliance group. In another organization, field employees were heavily consulted when revamping their pre-job brief meetings. During assessment activities, we were told that a) the process got much better, and b) people really appreciated leadership getting their input. This is good for safety and morale.

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Encourage a growth mindset in your workplace

Encourage a growth mindset in your workplace


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Growth mindset is the notion that who we are as a person (e.g., our character, abilities, intelligence) is malleable and capable of being developed with effort. At the opposite end of the spectrum is a fixed mindset, which describes when an individual feels their talents and abilities are predetermined and not flexible. Those with a more fixed mindset might feel some people “have it” and others “don’t”. Research on this topic began in education, where it was observed that students with a growth mindset approached difficulty as a challenge, and they were more likely to persevere with success despite setbacks. Students with a growth mindset vs. a fixed mindset had higher motivation, effort, and school outcomes (like math grades) (1).
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How to develop a growth mindset

How to develop a growth mindset


By Madison Hanscom, PhD

Changing how we think can have a profound impact on our life at home and work. Growth mindset is the notion that who we are as a person (e.g., our character, abilities, intelligence) is malleable and capable of being developed with effort. At the opposite end of the spectrum is a fixed mindset, which describes when an individual feels their talents and abilities are predetermined and not flexible. Those with a more fixed mindset might feel some people “have it” and others “don’t”. Research on this topic began in education, where it was observed that students with a growth mindset approached difficulty as a challenge, and they were more likely to persevere with success despite setbacks. Students with a growth mindset vs. a fixed mindset had higher motivation, effort, and school outcomes (like math grades) (1).
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Flex Work Teams: Defining a Great Team Member

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By Madison Hanscom, PhD

The future of work is here, and it is more flexible than the past. As a result of COVID-19, many individuals are working from home. A recent estimate was that a third of Americans are completing their jobs in a remote capacity. This has major implications for those who work in teams, and this begs the question - what does it take to be a great virtual team member?
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Diversity is key to business success: Leaders need to make a bigger pledge to drive impact

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From Eric Michrowski

The research is very clear on the value of diversity in the workplace. And when leaders think of diversity, it shouldn’t be limited to only 1 or 2 dimensions. The goal should be to bring as many perspectives and viewpoints to the table. In addition to being fair and a good corporate citizen, the purpose of diversity is to stimulate better debate when decisions are being made. When the right culture is in place, this helps improve the quality of solutions. In turn, this drives improved business performance. Read More...

The Benefits of Self-directed Learning



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By Kelly Cave & Julia Borges

Organizations face various challenges in today’s dynamic and complex world. With constantly changing technology, markets, and social trends, organizations must quickly learn and adapt in order to remain competitive within their markets. This increase in the importance of continuous learning has encouraged many organizations to transform themselves into learning organizations. A learning organization is an organization that places a high importance on learning and continuous improvement within their culture. This can be done by creating a supportive environment, implementing concrete learning processes, and encouraging leadership that reinforces learning (Garvin, Edmondson, & Gino, 2008). Whichever processes, methods, or practices leaders use to foster this type of culture, they all have a common goal: they want their team members to embrace continuous learning as a career-long process (Ellinger, 2004). As organizations work to become learning organizations, the more learning capability at the individual level becomes critical for success (Ellinger, 2004). Read More...