Ode to Augusta: Incidents Still Happen in Perfect Environments

Incidents Still Happen in Perfect Environments


By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

Last week, Dustin Johnson recorded the lowest score ever and won the Masters Golf Tournament at Augusta National during an odd, COVID-influenced November timeframe. Several years ago, I was fortunate to be able to attend a practice round at the Masters during its traditional April schedule. As advertised, the course was immaculate with its vividly green grass, azaleas in full bloom, undulating hills which TV can’t fully capture, and expansive grounds without a leaf or twig out of place. Birds even chirped in the trees (which, for some reason, were noticeably absent of squirrels). This hallowed ground was unlike anything I’ve ever experienced before. Almost.

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Promoting a Learning Culture in Challenging Environments

Promoting a Learning Culture in Challenging Environments


By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

Creating and sustaining a “learning culture” is critical for optimal safety culture and performance. Unfortunately, this can be challenging with organizations that have a history of “old school” cultures. In other cases, new leaders may legitimately need to establish a baseline of accountability to clean up messes created by overly lenient past practices. Overly lenient cultures often result in “looking the other way” and increased risk-taking behavior.
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The Power of Peer Feedback to Prevent SIFs

The Power of Peer Feedback to Prevent SIFs

By Josh Williams, Ph.D.

Peer-to-peer safety feedback is an integral way to improve safety culture and prevent serious injuries and fatalities (SIFs). Unfortunately, employees often fail to speak up when they observe coworkers’ risky behaviors even though they want to. Survey research shows that more than 90% of respondents believe employees
should caution others when they’re operating at-risk. And yet, only 60% say that actually do provide this feedback. Ironically, people underestimate others’ willingness to receive safety feedback. Specifically, 74% of respondents confirm they welcome safety feedback from peers but only 28% believe their coworkers do. This is an enormous misperception that may cost lives. Most SIFs occur with other employees around. If someone had simply spoken up, lives could have been saved.

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