Madison Hanscom

Safe Production Leadership Competency Series: Drive Thinking and Speaking

Leadership competencies


By Kelly Hamilton, Madison Hanscom, & Josh Williams

A key responsibility of leaders is creating an environment where people can do their best work. To do this well, leaders must be able to drive thinking and speaking—in other words, to foster a climate in which people feel they can speak up without fear of negative consequences, known as psychological safety. Leaders drive thinking and speaking by creating an environment of psychological safety, getting employee input for safety solutions, encouraging system thinking, and reinforcing teamwork and collaboration. Leaders who effectively create this environment increase employee engagement and decrease the likelihood of serious injuries and fatalities.
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Safe Production Leadership Competency Series: Recognize and Foster Growth

Leadership competencies


By Kelly Hamilton, Madison Hanscom, & Josh Williams

A critical skill all leaders must develop is the ability to provide high-quality feedback to their team members so they can perform their jobs well and grow and advance in their careers. When leaders do this well, it can fuel employee motivation and commitment, as well as positive safety outcomes. Read More...

Safe Production Leadership Competency Series: Build and Live the Vision

Leadership competencies


By Kelly Hamilton, Madison Hanscom, & Josh Williams

One of the most important jobs of any leader is to build and live the vision for employees. Building and living the vision means painting a picture for employees of desired performance and living and managing organizational values in everyday interactions. Providing employees with a sense of the organization’s vision and mission should inspire them to align their goals with those of the organization. Research indicates that when leaders encourage employees to strive for something beyond their individual goals, this has a positive impact on safety climate, safety compliance, and safety participation. Read More...

Safe Production Leadership Competency Series: Walk the Talk

Leadership competencies


By Kelly Hamilton, Madison Hanscom, & Josh Williams

It is not uncommon for leaders – who are pulled in many directions at once – to take shortcuts when it comes to safety. This can be detrimental, however, to safety culture and employees’ safety behaviors. In fact, research has shown that when employees perceive their leaders are not acting in ways that align with the company’s stated safety values, it leads to a decrease in safety compliance, a decrease in prioritization of avoiding accidents, and an increase in injuries.

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Safe Production Leadership Competency Series: Active Caring Promotes Positive Safety Culture

Leadership competencies



By Kelly Hamilton, Madison Hanscom, & Josh Williams

A common complaint of employees is that leadership doesn’t dedicate enough time to listen to and respond to their needs. Over time, this can lead workers to believe their leaders don’t care about them or their concerns, which can erode safety culture. Active Caring is a core leadership competency because it demonstrates organizational support and fosters a sense of support and trust among employees, leading to positive outcomes for employees, the team, and the entire organization.

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Blog Series: Five Core Safe Production Leadership Competencies that Drive Safe Production Culture

Leadership competencies

By Kelly Hamilton, Madison Hanscom, & Josh Williams

In today’s increasingly complex workplace, organizational leaders must be equipped to effectively deal with the relentless demands of daily decisions, challenges, and opportunities that impact all aspects of business, including safety. It is increasingly important to make intelligent decisions for safety in order to advance safety culture and prevent serious injuries and fatalities at work. Read More...

How setting goals during action planning can help make training stick

brainstorming working on wall paper post its

By Kelly Cave and Madison Hanscom

Training is an effective way for companies to facilitate knowledge and skill development in their employees, which in turn, helps them remain competitive in their respective markets. The extent to which knowledge and skills learned in training are used on-the-job is commonly referred to as training transfer1. Unfortunately, studies indicate that significant amounts of training content do not end up transferring to the job (2). This lack of transfer is a major concern, in large part because companies spend significant amounts of money on training. According to the Association for Talent Development, each year businesses in the U.S. on average spend over $1,200 per employee on training and development (3). Given the widespread prevalence of training and the large sums of money companies continue to devote to it, it is no surprise that many leaders are concerned with improving their employees’ training transfer. Luckily, there are many techniques that can be used to help make training stick. One of the most well-researched and supported techniques is goal-setting. Read More...

Generational Differences at Work: More Conflict Than Clarity?

team hands all in

By Madison Hanscom

Generational Differences at Work: More Conflict Than Clarity?
Most of us are familiar with generational stereotypes. Millennials are narcissistic, Gen Xers are cynical, and Baby Boomers are judgmental. When scanning the workplace, it might seem easy to find patterns of behavior that correspond with these generational cohort characteristics, but are these patterns actually there? And for any differences that do emerge, are these actually due to generational cohort membership? Read More...

Leadership Visibility: The importance of leaving the desk and getting out into the field

safe workers

By Julia Borges and Madison Hanscom

As we move into a world where the use of technology is rapidly increasing to make our work lives more seamless, it can be easy to forget about the importance of human interaction. While artificial intelligence has become a vital part of organizational performance, human interaction is still at the core of organizational health, culture, and safety. In today’s complex, technology-driven world of work, leaders are as busy as they ever have been, making it difficult for them to get away from their desk and out into the field with their teams. While leaders have a commitment to their tasks, duties, and team members, balancing these critical components can pose quite a challenge for leaders across various types of organizations. Read More...

Staying Engaged and Safe During the Holidays

snow and road

By Julia Borges, Maggie Carey, and Madison Hanscom

‘Tis the season to stay engaged and safe in the workplace. In the midst of the bustle of the holidays, it’s easy for employees to get distracted, which can lead to unwanted incidents or fatalities during such a jubilant time of the year. Even though it might not happen to everyone, it is possible that some employees feel a sense of burnout or distraction around the end of the year. Heightened emotions and the overall chaotic environment of the holiday season also have the ability to exhaust employees both physically and mentally. When physical and mental resources are depleted, employees are more likely to make mistakes and injure themselves or others. Maintaining employee engagement throughout the holidays is key. However, for most companies it’s possible that employee engagement could dip right before the holidays.

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